Public Health

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About Human West Nile Neuroninvasive Disease

Eighty percent of people who are infected with WNV will show no symptoms at all. Up to 20% of the people who become infected will experience West Nile Fever and have symptoms such as fever, headache, and body aches, nausea, vomiting, and sometimes swollen lymph glands or a skin rash on the chest, stomach and back. Symptoms can last for as short as a few days, though even healthy people have become sick for several weeks. About one in 150 people infected with WNV will develop severe illness known as West Nile Neuroinvasive Disease (WNND). The severe symptoms can include high fever, headache, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness, vision loss, numbness and paralysis. These symptoms may last several weeks, and neurological effects may be permanent.

Most common symptoms/signs of West Nile Fever and West Nile Neuroinvasive Disease:

West Nile Fever (WNF)-fever, headache, sore throat, body aches, fatigue, skin rash and swollen lymph glands.

West Nile Neuroinvasive Disease (WNND) - headache, high fever, stiff neck, disorientation, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness, coma and paralysis.

2009-2014 Statistics Overview

Fort Bend County West Nile Data 2009-2014

Year

Mosquito

Pool

Horse

Bird

Human West Nile Fever

Human West Nile Neuroinvasive Disease

Total

Human cases

Human Death

2014

8

0

0

2

2

4

0

2013

0

0

0

0

1

1

0

2012

21

2

0

10

4

14

0

2011

4

0

0

0

0

0

0

2010

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2009

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

Source: Texas DSHS

2014 West Nile Virus Illness Specific Statistics

Please see the table below for the 2014 information on West Nile illness reported in Fort Bend County & Texas. Take note the diagnosis of each case is now being listed.

Case #

Age Group

Gender

Diagnosis

Location

1

45-54

Female

WNF

Missouri City

2

45-54

Male

WNND

Stafford

3

35-44

Female

WNND

Sugar Land

4

55-74

Male

WNF

Katy

For Updates on West Nile case counts check back here, or follow the Fort Bend County department of Health and Human Services on Twitter or Like us on Facebook.

Protect Yourself from Infection

Protect yourself from mosquitoes by remembering the four D's:

  • DUSK/DAWN are the times of day you should try to stay indoors. This is when infected mosquitoes are most active.
  • DRESS in long sleeves and pants when you're outside. For extra protection, you may want to spray thin clothing with repellent.
  • DEET (N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide) is an ingredient to look for in your insect repellent. Follow label instructions, and always wear repellent when outdoors. Reapply as you would with suncreen, after sweating and swimming.
  • DRAIN standing water in your backyard and neighborhood - old tires, flowerpots, and clogged rain gutters. These are mosquito-breeding sites.

Additional Information:

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